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Johnson & Johnson is recalling five Neutrogena and Aveeno aerosol sunscreens after a sample tested positive for a cancer-causing chemical, benzene. According to the recall published by Johnson & Johnson, the sunscreen products impacted are:

  • NEUTROGENA® Beach Defense® aerosol sunscreen
  • NEUTROGENA® Cool Dry Sport aerosol sunscreen
  • NEUTROGENA® Invisible Daily™ defense aerosol sunscreen
  • NEUTROGENA® Ultra Sheer® aerosol sunscreen
  • AVEENO® Protect + Refresh aerosol sunscreen

Consumers should be able to trust that the sunscreen they purchase by Johnson & Johnson will protect them and not put them at risk of developing cancer. The purpose of sunscreen is to protect our skin and reduce the risk of developing cancer. Johnson & Johnson has put consumers at risk once again by selling a product containing a cancer-causing chemical.

What Is Benzene?

Benzene is a chemical produced naturally and by human activity during the production process. The chemical can be produced naturally from volcanoes and forest fires. People are often exposed to low levels of benzene from gasoline, smoke from some tobacco products, and household cleaners.

Long and frequent exposure to benzene can be deadly to humans. The chemical can cause cells to mutate and increase the risk of developing types of blood cancer, like leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For contaminated Jonson & Johnson aerosol sunscreen, this exposure can occur through absorption through the skin.

Compensation for Benzene in Sunscreens

The Whitley Law Firm is investigating cancer cases linked to sunscreens with unsafe levels of benzene. If you or a loved one used a contaminated sunscreen and developed cancer (such as leukemia or non-Hodgkin lymphoma), our product liability lawyers can help.

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